East Midlands Attractions by County

Major Attractions in the East Midlands

The East Midlands is home to the majestic Lincoln Cathedral, not to mention the Peak District National Park. Factor in an endless array of historical sites and you've got yourself an enchanting holiday destination.

Solomon's Temple, Buxton

Derbyshire Attractions

Derbyshire beckons visitors with a wide variety of attractions and activities. From the rolling hills of the Peak District, teeming…

Derbyshire Attractions Read More

Derbyshire beckons visitors with a wide variety of attractions and activities. From the rolling hills of the Peak District, teeming…

Tropical Birdland, Desford

Leicestershire Attractions

The ceremonial county of Leicestershire has an eventful past that’s exhibited in an assortment of historical sites and museums. It’s…

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The ceremonial county of Leicestershire has an eventful past that’s exhibited in an assortment of historical sites and museums. It’s…

Lincoln Cathedral

Lincolnshire Attractions

Lincolnshire boasts a rich history, diverse scentary and a variety of attractions for visitors, ranging from major historical attractions to…

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Lincolnshire boasts a rich history, diverse scentary and a variety of attractions for visitors, ranging from major historical attractions to…

Silverstone Circuit, Silverstone

Northamptonshire Attractions

Northamptonshire reveals a mosaic of quaint villages, expansive vistas and age-old landmarks beckoning to be discovered. Though it may not…

Northamptonshire Attractions Read More

Northamptonshire reveals a mosaic of quaint villages, expansive vistas and age-old landmarks beckoning to be discovered. Though it may not…

Holme Pierrepont Country Park

Nottinghamshire Attractions

Embark on a quintessential English adventure in Nottinghamshire, a county brimming with parks and open-spaces, historic sites and family-friendly activities….

Nottinghamshire Attractions Read More

Embark on a quintessential English adventure in Nottinghamshire, a county brimming with parks and open-spaces, historic sites and family-friendly activities….

Normanton Church, Normanton

Rutland Attractions

The enchanting county of Rutland is England’s smallest. But it’s populatated by an assortment of top visitor attractions and activities,…

Rutland Attractions Read More

The enchanting county of Rutland is England’s smallest. But it’s populatated by an assortment of top visitor attractions and activities,…

About the East Midlands

Tucked away in the central region of England, the East Midlands unfurls as a vibrant tableau of landscapes, each painted with its own distinct hues of history, nature, and culture.

A journey through this region is akin to thumbing the pages of a well-illustrated book, where every chapter offers a fresh story, a new vista.

Begin in the heart of the East Midlands, where the rolling green plains seem to stretch endlessly, occasionally interrupted by clusters of woodlands.

These expanses are remnants of ancient forests, such as Sherwood in Nottinghamshire, where legend has it that Robin Hood once roamed.

The whispering trees, centuries-old, seem to murmur tales of outlaws, adventures, and bygone eras.

The Landscapes

The region's landscapes are not just flat plains. Venture to Derbyshire, and the Peak District National Park greets you with its undulating hills, limestone dales, and rugged high moorlands.

The stark contrast between the soft, green dales and the wilder, heather-clad moorlands offers a dynamic backdrop for both casual travellers and avid hikers.

Edale, the start of the Pennine Way, beckons long-distance walkers, while places like Dovedale, with its iconic stepping stones, enthrall those seeking a gentle ramble.

Rivers and Waterways

Flowing seamlessly through this terrain are waterways that have carved their mark, both naturally and through human endeavour.

The River Trent, one of the UK's major rivers, meanders through the region, providing vital sustenance to the lush meadows and serving as a picturesque setting for towns like Newark and Burton upon Trent.

The Grand Union Canal, with its heritage locks and longboats, narrates a different chapter of the East Midlands, one of industry and commerce.

History

A mention of the East Midlands' landscape would be incomplete without acknowledging its historical imprints.

The remnants of Roman towns, ancient castles, and stately homes are scattered across the horizon.

Lincolnshire, with its majestic Lincoln Cathedral, seems to transport visitors to a time where Gothic architecture reigned supreme, and faith was etched in stone.

Rutland, England’s smallest county, might be diminutive in size but is grand in its offerings, with the serene Rutland Water providing a haven for wildlife enthusiasts and water sports aficionados.

The East Midlands’ industrial heritage, particularly in areas like Coalville in Leicestershire, has also left its mark on the landscape.

What were once bustling coal mines have now transformed, in many areas, into verdant nature reserves or innovative leisure spaces, symbolising the region's adaptability and resilience.

Agriculture, too, plays a significant role in moulding the region's character. Expanses of arable land yield golden crops, while pastures support grazing livestock.

The patchwork of fields, often bordered by hedgerows or drystone walls, lends a rustic charm, creating a palpable connection between the land and its people.

In essence, the East Midlands is a celebration of diversity. Its landscapes narrate tales of ancient legends, of nature's bounty, of human ingenuity and endeavour.

Every meadow, hill, river, and relic is a testament to the region's rich tapestry, inviting visitors to pause, reflect, and immerse themselves in its multifaceted beauty.

Towns, Villages and Cities

This part of the country, where the narrative of time is woven into every street, square, and valley, presents a captivating blend of urban sophistication and quaint countryside charm.

At the forefront of the region's urban tapestry is Nottingham, a city that effortlessly marries its legendary past with contemporary flair.

Known for its association with Robin Hood, its bustling Lace Market, and the historic Nottingham Castle perched on Castle Rock, the city offers a dynamic fusion of culture, shopping, and heritage.

Derby, another city gem in the East Midlands, is steeped in industrial lore.

As the birthplace of the British railway and a hub for aerospace engineering, its modern ambitions stand alongside beautiful conservation areas like the Cathedral Quarter, which boasts cobbled streets and Georgian architecture.

Yet, it isn't just the cities that demand attention. The town of Stamford in Lincolnshire is a picturesque embodiment of traditional England.

Its preserved medieval core, punctuated by churches, timber-framed houses, and the meandering River Welland, has earned it frequent mentions as one of the country's best places to live.

Its stone-built structures, reflecting the pale hues of Lincolnshire limestone, whisper tales of bygone eras.

Similarly, Bakewell, nestled within the heart of the Peak District, is famed for its delightful charm and the eponymous Bakewell Pudding.

With its stone bridges crossing the River Wye and bustling markets, it's a town where history and local commerce dance in delightful harmony.

Further into Derbyshire, Matlock and its adjacent Matlock Bath offer both serene beauty and a touch of the unusual.

While Matlock is characterised by its gorge and cable cars offering panoramic views, Matlock Bath, with its promenades and riverside chalets, feels like a seaside resort transported to the Midlands.

Loughborough, in Leicestershire, with its renowned university, blends youthful exuberance with a rich tapestry of history.

The Great Central Railway, a preserved steam railway, is a testament to the town's connection to the golden age of rail.

The village of Edwinstowe in Nottinghamshire, believed to be the location where Robin Hood wed Maid Marian, is more than just its folklore.

Surrounded by the ancient Sherwood Forest, this village offers an embrace of verdant woodlands and the age-old tales they safeguard.

Among the smaller jewels is Castleton in the Peak District, a haven for geology enthusiasts. It's home to caverns like the Blue John Cavern, showcasing unique mineral deposits.

Its location, surrounded by hills and dales, makes it a favourite starting point for many a countryside ramble.

Lastly, the city of Lincoln cannot be overlooked. Its cathedral, an architectural marvel, dominates the skyline, while the city itself, built on a steep hill, offers layers of history from Roman times to the present.

Major Visitor Attractions

Visitors to this central region of England are treated to a diverse range of experiences, each more enriching than the last.

One cannot begin the narrative of the East Midlands without mentioning the legendary Sherwood Forest in Nottinghamshire.

This ancient woodland, once the reputed hideout of the famed Robin Hood and his band of Merry Men, still stands tall, whispering tales of outlaws and adventures.

Its sprawling canopy is home to the Major Oak, a centuries-old tree around which many Robin Hood legends are woven.

In the heart of Derbyshire lies the Peak District National Park, the first national park in the United Kingdom.

A haven for outdoor enthusiasts, its undulating landscapes, from the rugged Dark Peak moorlands to the softer White Peak dales, offer myriad trails, cycling routes, and panoramic vistas.

Sites like the Peveril Castle in Castleton provide a historical backdrop to the natural beauty.

Lincolnshire plays host to the magnificent Lincoln Cathedral, a Gothic masterpiece that was once the tallest structure in the world.

Its imposing architecture, combined with the intricate stained-glass Rose Window, makes it a beacon for history buffs and architecture enthusiasts alike.

Not far from the cathedral, Lincoln Castle stands as a testimony to Norman craftsmanship, with its well-preserved walls offering views of the city.

The East Midlands’ industrial heritage is brilliantly captured at Derby's Silk Mill, often regarded as the world's first factory.

Now the Museum of Making, it pays homage to the region's innovative spirit and the industrial revolution, with interactive displays that intrigue both young and old.

In Leicestershire, the National Space Centre offers a journey through the cosmos.

With its iconic rocket tower and engaging planetarium shows, visitors can delve into the mysteries of the universe, space exploration, and the wonders of astronomy.

Nottingham boasts the unique City of Caves, a subterranean network that dives deep into the city’s history.

These sandstone caves, used for various purposes over the centuries, provide an underground exploration like no other.

Above ground, Nottingham Castle, after its recent transformation, narrates the city's history with a blend of art and interactive displays.

Another underground marvel is the Creswell Crags, on the border of Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire.

This limestone gorge is home to caves that once sheltered Ice Age hunters, and its ancient wall carvings make it a significant archaeological site.

For those seeking serenity, the Rutland Water Nature Reserve in England’s smallest county offers a haven.

This man-made reservoir is not just an engineering feat but also a hotspot for birdwatchers, with its wetlands attracting a plethora of avian species.

Lastly, in Northamptonshire, the Silverstone Circuit vrooms with energy, especially during the British Grand Prix.

Motor enthusiasts flock here to witness the adrenaline-pumping action, making it one of the most electrifying attractions in the region.

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