Derbyshire Attractions

Derbyshire beckons visitors with a wide variety of attractions and activities.

From the rolling hills of the Peak District, teeming with nature trails and hikes, to the many historic sites that populate the county, Derbyshire promises plenty of things to see and do.

To help you plan a trip to this beguiling region, we showcase some of the best things to do in Derbyshire including museums, World Heritage Sites and country houses.

Old House Museum, Bakewell

Old House Museum, Bakewell

Old House Museum is housed in a 16th-century yeoman’s dwelling. In low-ceilinged rooms and creaky corridors, you’ll encounter an array of artefacts that range from Victorian toys to period costumes.

One can’t help but be captivated by the intricate lace displays and the ancient kitchen equipment, each narrating its own slice of history.

The museum’s timbered structure itself has stories etched into its beams and walls, and its walled garden exudes an old-world charm, making it a serene spot to reflect on the past.

Whether you’re a history buff or simply curious, this museum in Bakewell offers a unique journey and is one of those must-visit places in Derbyshire.

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Barrow Hill Roundhouse Railway Centre, Chesterfield

Barrow Hill Roundhouse Railway Centre, Chesterfield

Also on our list of things to do in Derbyshire is the Barrow Hill Roundhouse Railway Centre. Located in Chesterfield, this living museum is a magnificent embodiment of Britain’s illustrious railway heritage.

As one of the last surviving operational railway roundhouses in the UK, it offers visitors an unrivalled journey into the golden age of steam and rail.

Originally opened in 1870 to accommodate the burgeoning railway network, the Roundhouse quickly became a hub of locomotive activity.

Decades of service saw it evolve, but by the mid-20th century, the advent of diesel and electric trains signalled a decline in traditional roundhouses. Thankfully, Barrow Hill escaped demolition, and in the 1990s, was revived as a railway heritage centre.

Today, it boasts an impressive collection of steam, diesel, and electric locomotives. The turntable, once a crucial feature for redirecting locomotives, still operates, offering a rare spectacle for visitors.

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Strutt’s North Mill, Belper

Strutt's North Mill, Belper

As one of the most acclaimed Derbyshire attractions, Strutt’s North Mill stands as a symbol of Britain’s industrial revolution and the progression of textile manufacturing.

Erected in 1804 on the foundations of an earlier mill, this structure is notable for its pioneering “fire-proof” design aimed at reducing the risk of fires, a prevalent danger in cotton mills.

As a part of the Derwent Valley Mills World Heritage Site, the mill offers a window into the transformational era when mechanised factories changed the landscape of work and society.

Inside, visitors are presented with a tapestry of tales, from the innovative water-powered machinery that revolutionised cotton spinning, to the stories of the workers who toiled within its walls.

Additionally, the adjacent river and millpond underscore the importance of water in driving the machinery and the industry.

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Blue John Cavern, Castleton

Stalactites

Blue John Cavern is a mesmerising natural wonder that intertwines geological splendour with human craftsmanship.

The cavern boasts an enchanting display of the semi-precious mineral ‘Blue John’, known for its radiant blue and yellow hues.

This limestone cave system, sculpted over millennia by water action, reveals breathtaking chambers and glistening mineral formations at every twist and turn.

A testament to nature’s artistry, stalactites and stalagmites adorn the cave’s interiors, painting a scene of ethereal beauty.

The cavern’s significance, however, isn’t just geological. Historically, miners have meticulously extracted the Blue John mineral, crafting exquisite ornaments and artefacts that have gained recognition worldwide.

These traditional mining techniques, honed over generations, resonate with tales of skill and dedication.

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Bolsover Castle, Bolsover

Bolsover Castle, Bolsover

Perched atop a hill in Bolsover, Derbyshire, Bolsover Castle offers an evocative glimpse into Stuart England. Originally constructed in the 12th century and rebuilt in the 17th century, the castle masterfully fuses medieval architecture with Jacobean elegance.

Commissioned by Sir Charles Cavendish and his son, William, the design aimed to impress and entertain, rather than serve as a fortress.

The castle’s interiors captivate with opulent rooms and intricate carvings, most notably in the Little Castle’s lavish suites.

The Star Chamber and the Heaven Room showcase exceptional artistry with their painted ceilings and walls, epitomising the era’s aesthetic tastes. Additionally, the Venus Fountain Garden, featuring an array of playful sculptures, offers a serene backdrop.

Beyond its architectural allure, Bolsover Castle has been the stage for many historic events, from royal visits to political gatherings.

Today, managed by English Heritage, it serves as an educational and recreational venue, where visitors can explore the UK’s history, attend themed events, and enjoy panoramic views of the Derbyshire landscape.

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Calke Abbey, Ticknall

Calke Abbey, Ticknall

Calke Abbey offers visitors an unvarnished glimpse into English aristocratic life. Unlike typical restorations, the National Trust chose to preserve Calke Abbey in a state of “elegant decay“, highlighting the wear and accumulation of time.

Built in the 18th century on the site of a former priory, the Baroque mansion is replete with peeling paint, overgrown courtyards, and untouched rooms filled with curiosities.

The extensive estate grounds, featuring ancient trees and serene ponds, provide a contrasting backdrop of nature’s vitality.

Calke Abbey stands not just as a building, but as a poignant reminder of changing times and the impermanence of grandeur.

Its authentic preservation approach allows history to speak for itself, making each visit a unique journey through the annals of time – great for Derbyshire family days out.

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Carsington Water, Ashbourne

Carsington Water, Ashbourne

Carsington Water represents a harmonious fusion of human innovation and natural splendour. Crafted as a reservoir, this expansive water body has blossomed into a vibrant hub for outdoor enthusiasts and nature lovers alike.

Encircled by undulating landscapes and lush greenery, its crystalline waters mirror the skies and beckon a diverse range of aquatic adventures, from windsurfing to paddle-boarding.

On its fringes, intertwining pathways offer wanderers, cyclists, and avian aficionados a chance to explore and marvel at the area’s rich biodiversity.

The on-site interpretation centre delves into the reservoir’s creation and its ecological role, captivating curious minds.

Carsington Water stands as a testament to how human endeavours can enhance, rather than detract from, the beauty of the natural world. If you’re looking for water-based Peak District activities, then it’s well-worth the time and effort.

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Chatsworth House, Bakewell

Chatsworth House, Bakewell

In the heart of Bakewell lies Chatsworth House, a beacon of aristocratic distinction and cultural heritage in Derbyshire.

Renowned as the ancestral abode of the Duke of Devonshire, this palatial estate presents a panorama of architectural finesse and interior opulence.

Each chamber unfurls a narrative, filled with treasured artworks, ornate furnishings, and curated relics from bygone epochs.

The facade, a symphony of design epochs, stands as a testament to evolving tastes across centuries.

Beyond the stone and mortar, the sprawling gardens, punctuated with sculpted fountains, maze-like topiaries, and curated flora, offer a verdant escape.

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Crooked Spire Church, Chesterfield

Crooked Spire Church, Chesterfield

In the heart of Chesterfield, the town’s skyline is dominated by a unique and curious structure: the Crooked Spire of St. Mary and All Saints Church.

This twisted, spiralling pinnacle, defying conventional architectural norms, has intrigued visitors and locals alike for centuries.

Built in the 14th century, the spire, constructed from green timber and clad in lead, is believed to have warped over time due to the metal heating up and the wood beneath it contracting at different rates.

Beyond its physical distortion, the spire is shrouded in tales and legends, with some attributing its twist to the devil’s influence or an building error. Regardless of the cause, Chesterfield’s Crooked Spire remains a beloved emblem of the town.

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Cromford Mills, Cromford

Cromford Mills, Cromford
Image: cromfordmills.org.uk

Nestled in the serene setting of Cromford, Cromford Mills is a monument to industrial innovation.

Established by Sir Richard Arkwright in the late 18th century, this mill became the vanguard of the Industrial Revolution, introducing the world to water-powered cotton spinning on an unprecedented scale.

Arkwright’s pioneering approach laid the groundwork for modern factory systems, revolutionising textile manufacturing. The mill’s groundbreaking design and practices became a blueprint for industries globally.

Now celebrated as part of the Derwent Valley Mills UNESCO World Heritage site, Cromford Mills continues to captivate visitors, offering a vivid glimpse into the dawn of modern industry.

If you’re looking for things to do in Derbyshire, then this internationally-acclaimed visitor attraction is a must-visit.

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Derby Cathedral, Derby

Derby Cathedral, Derby~
Image: derbycathedral.org

Derby Cathedral, officially known as the Cathedral of All Saints, stands tall in the heart of Derby, exuding both architectural grandeur and profound spiritual resonance.

As the seat of the Bishop of Derby, it has been a pivotal place of worship and spiritual reflection since the 10th century.

Its tower, one of the tallest in England, offers fantastic views of the city, while inside, the cathedral boasts a blend of architectural styles, from Norman remnants to intricate Gothic details.

Notably, it houses the oldest ring of ten bells in the world. Over the years, Derby Cathedral has evolved, yet it retains its core essence, serving as a place of solace, prayer, and community gathering.

With a rich tapestry of history interwoven with Derby’s own story, the cathedral remains a cherished emblem of the city’s spiritual and cultural landscape.

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Derwent Valley Mills, Belper

Derwent Valley Mills, Belper

Derwent Valley Mills World Heritage Site, stretching along the River Derwent in Derbyshire, is an emblematic testament to the dawn of the Industrial Revolution and one of the most important historical sites in Derbyshire.

This extensive site features a series of pioneering cotton mills and related industrial buildings, while showcasing the communities that sprang up around them.

Recognized by UNESCO for its exceptional historical significance, it traces the innovative waterpower system introduced in the 18th century.

Richard Arkwright’s Cromford Mill, often hailed as the world’s first successful water-powered cotton spinning mill, stands as a cornerstone of this transformation.

The well-preserved landscapes, structures, and communities of the site offer a vivid chronicle of an era that reshaped the fabric of societies across the globe.

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Dovedale, Ashbourne

Thorpe Cloud

Dovedale, located near Ashbourne in the Peak District National Park, is a captivating valley renowned for its dramatic limestone ravines and serene River Dove.

This natural haven boasts a labyrinth of towering limestone spires, woodland, and iconic stepping stones that cross the tranquil waters.

The area is a magnet for outdoor enthusiasts, offering a network of paths that meander through its picturesque landscape, revealing the breathtaking Thorpe Cloud and Lovers’ Leap.

This idyllic setting, with its combination of raw natural beauty and a palpable sense of serenity, has been an inspiration for artists, poets, and all who seek refuge from the bustle of modern life.

A visit to Dovedale promises an immersive experience in one of the UK’s most cherished natural landscapes.

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Elvaston Castle Country Park, Elvaston

Elvaston Castle Country Park, Elvaston

Elvaston Castle Country Park, situated in Elvaston, Derbyshire, is a splendid fusion of architectural elegance and natural beauty. The heart of the park, Elvaston Castle, is a Gothic Revival masterpiece surrounded by 200 acres of meticulously designed gardens and woodlands.

Crafted by notable landscape designer William Barron in the 19th century, the grounds feature a series of themed gardens, including the mesmerizing Golden Garden and the tranquil Moorish Garden.

The expansive parkland, dotted with serene lakes and ornamental bridges, offers idyllic walking trails where visitors can immerse themselves in nature while marvelling at the castle’s imposing facade.

As seasons change, the park showcases a diverse palette of colours, ensuring a captivating experience year-round. Castle Country Park is a must-visit Derbyshire attraction for both nature enthusiasts and history buffs.

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Gulliver’s Kingdom, Matlock Bath

Roller Coaster

Perched on the hillsides of Matlock Bath, Gulliver’s Kingdom transports visitors to a world of imagination and whimsy.

Designed especially for children between the ages of 2 to 13, this theme park is a vibrant tapestry of thrilling rides, captivating shows, and interactive play areas.

From the dizzying heights of the Drop Tower to the magical journey on the Toyland Express, every attraction promises a dose of exhilaration.

The terraced layout offers panoramic views of the surrounding Derbyshire landscape, making it a treat for both the adventure seekers and nature lovers.

With dedicated zones like Lilliput Land and Dinosaur Kingdom, Gulliver’s Kingdom ensures a diverse range of experiences tailored to the fantasies of its young visitors, thereby offeringg a fantastic day out in Derbyshire.

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Eyam Hall, Derbyshire

Eyam Hall, Derbyshire
Image: eyamhall.net

Constructed in the 17th century, this Jacobean manor house marries the grandeur of the past with the stories of the present.

Its facade, marked by ornate stone mullions and robust timber frames, is a visual treat for history and architecture enthusiasts.

Venturing inside, visitors are met with a trove of family heirlooms, ancestral portraits, and intricately designed furnishings that chronicle the lives of its longstanding occupants, the Wright family.

Complementing the hall’s architectural beauty is its splendid garden, which unfurls a tapestry of seasonal blooms, manicured hedges, and tranquil nooks.

Beyond its physical allure, Eyam Hall’s proximity to the village accentuates its historical importance, especially given Eyam’s courageous response during the 1665 plague.

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Haddon Hall, Bakewell

Haddon Hall, Bakewell

Haddon Hall, located in Bakewell, Derbyshire, is one of the oldest manor houses in England, with its origins dating back to the 11th century.

The medieval and Tudor hall showcases authentic architecture, largely untouched by time. Key features include the Elizabethan terraced gardens, ornate wooden panelling, and grand banquet hall.

Overlooking the River Wye, the manor’s positioning offers panoramic views of the Peak District.

The Manners family has owned Haddon Hall for several centuries, and its impeccable preservation has made it a popular location for film and TV productions.

A visit to Haddon Hall offers a genuine step back in time, making it a must-see for history and architecture enthusiasts visiting Derbyshire.

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Hardwick Hall, Chesterfield

Hardwick Hall, Chesterfield

Nestled in the heart of Derbyshire’s undulating landscapes, Hardwick Hall is a majestic Elizabethan gem that whispers tales of a bygone era. This iconic mansion, with its vast glass windows, showcases the ambition of its original owner, Bess of Hardwick.

Renowned not only for its architecture but also its rich tapestries and art collections, Hardwick Hall serves as a pristine link to the grandeur of the Elizabethan age.

The surrounding grounds, featuring meticulously manicured gardens and picturesque walking trails, blend natural beauty with historical relevance.

As a cherished property of the National Trust, Hardwick Hall is a must-visit for history enthusiasts, architecture admirers, and anyone yearning for a dash of Elizabethan elegance.

Conveniently located near Chesterfield, this enchanting mansion promises an immersive journey through time and a testament to the enduring legacy of the English aristocracy.

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Heights of Abraham, Matlock Bath

Heights of Abraham, Matlock Bath
Image: heightsofabraham.com

Situated in the heart of the stunning Peak District, the Heights of Abraham offers visitors a unique blend of natural beauty and human innovation in Matlock Bath.

Ascend by the captivating cable car experience, presenting breathtaking panoramic views of the Derwent Valley below. Once atop, the landscape unfurls a tapestry of woodlands, caverns, and historic mining sites.

Delve into the two famous show caverns – the Great Masson and Rutland – where the tales of miners from centuries past come alive.

Their history, intertwined with the natural formations of stalactites and stalagmites, offers a fascinating journey into the Earth’s depths.

Above ground, the estate’s winding pathways guide visitors through meticulously landscaped gardens and viewpoints, each offering its own slice of Derbyshire’s splendid vistas.

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Go Ape, Buxton

Tree-Top Course

Go Ape in Buxton presents an exhilarating treetop adventure for thrill-seekers and nature enthusiasts alike.

This aerial forest park offers visitors a chance to channel their inner Tarzan, swinging, climbing, and zip-lining through the canopy of majestic trees.

The course is meticulously designed with a series of obstacles, rope bridges, and exhilarating zip- lines that provide both challenge and excitement.

Each level offers increasing complexity, ensuring that novices and adrenaline junkies are equally entertained. Beyond the high-flying action, Go Ape’s vantage points offer inspiring views of Buxton’s picturesque landscapes.

Conveniently located and set against the backdrop of Buxton’s natural beauty, Go Ape is a major Derbyshire visitor attraction for the whole family.

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Kedleston Hall, Derby

Kedleston Hall, Derby

Situated just a short drive from Derby, Kedleston Hall emerges as an epitome of neoclassical architecture, enveloped within expansive parklands.

Managed by the National Trust, this grand 18th-century mansion was envisaged by Robert Adam, whose design prowess is evident in every facet of the hall, from its opulent interiors to its grand façade.

Kedleston Hall offers a deep dive into the lives of the Curzon family, its historic residents. Each room tells tales of bygone eras, adorned with artefacts, intricate woodwork, and portraits that capture the essence of its storied past.

The state rooms, with their lavish decors, stand as testimonials to the hall’s role as a hub of social gatherings and opulence.

Outside, the landscaped grounds beckon visitors to wander amidst serene lakes, classical bridges, and carefully curated gardens.

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Mam Tor, Castleton

Mam Tor, Castleton

Majestically rising above the picturesque village of Castleton, Mam Tor, also known as the ‘Shivering Mountain‘, is one of the most iconic landmarks of the Peak District.

Boasting a height of over 500 metres, this ancient hill offers panoramic views that stretch across the Hope Valley and the surrounding moorlands.

Its rich history is evident in the remnants of an Iron Age hillfort crowning its summit, bearing silent testimony to the region’s ancient inhabitants.

Hikers and nature enthusiasts are drawn to its well-trodden paths, which provide both challenging ascents and leisurely walks, all offering rewarding vistas at every turn.

The summit, with its unobstructed 360-degree views, is a popular spot at sunrise, when the first rays illuminate the undulating landscape below.

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Midland Railway, Butterley

Midland Railway, Butterley

Located in the heart of Derbyshire, the Midland Railway in Butterley offers visitors a nostalgic trip back to the golden age of rail travel.

This heritage railway, stretching over 3.5 miles between Butterley and Swanwick Junction, is meticulously preserved, showcasing the grandeur and romance of bygone train journeys.

Guests can embark on vintage steam or diesel locomotives, marvelling at the lovingly restored carriages and the scenic Derbyshire landscapes that unfold outside the windows.

Each journey promises not just transport but a genuine immersion into the rich tapestry of British railway history.

The Butterley station itself is a piece of living history. Beyond train rides, it features railway museums, a model railway, and various exhibits detailing the engineering feats, daily operations, and cultural impact of the Midland Railway era.

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Monsal Trail, Bakewell

Monsal Trail, Bakewell

The Monsal Trail is one of Bakewell’s runs 8.5 miles along a disused railway line and is a haven for walkers, cyclists, and horse riders alike.

Beginning near Bakewell and wending its way through some of the Peak District’s most picturesque landscapes, the trail boasts a unique blend of natural beauty and industrial heritage.

The route includes breathtaking limestone dales, dense woodland, and the iconic Monsal Viaduct.

Several restored tunnels along the trail add a touch of adventure, their well-lit interiors ensuring a safe passage. Informative signboards dot the route, delving into the region’s rich history and geological wonders.

Accessible all year round and largely flat, the Monsal Trail is suitable for all ages and fitness levels.

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Peak District National Park

Peak District National Park

The Peak District National Park is Britain’s first national park, established in 1951. Covering more than 555 square miles, the park comprises a faired landscape of rugged moorland and rolling green dales.

Red grouses, mountain hares, and majestic stags roam freely, while ancient woodlands and serene lakes punctuate the terrain.

The park’s geology is equally captivating, with limestone caverns, plateaus, and iconic gritstone edges offering awe-inspiring vistas.

For visitors, the Peak District presents a myriad of activities. Whether it’s hiking the Pennine Way, exploring historic estates like Chatsworth House, or delving into subterranean caves, adventure awaits at every turn.

Charming villages, steeped in history and local culture, dot the landscape, ensuring a warm welcome for those who venture its bounds.

Combining natural splendour with cultural richness, the Peak District National Park is a cherished haven, beckoning explorers and nature enthusiasts to its evergreen embrace.

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Peveril Castle, Castleton

Peveril Castle, Castleton

Perched high above the charming village of Castleton, Peveril Castle stands as a sentinel to the past, its ruins whispering tales of medieval grandeur.

Constructed in the 11th century by William Peveril, a favoured knight of William the Conqueror, the castle’s imposing silhouette against the skyline is a testament to Norman architecture and military strategy.

Overlooking the Hope Valley, the castle offers panoramic views of the surrounding Peak District, making it a sought-after vantage point. The keep, though partially in ruins, remains the centrepiece, and a climb to its top rewards with unparalleled vistas.

Within the castle grounds, interpretative panels guide visitors through its history, recounting its significance during the Anarchy of the 12th century and its eventual decline into disuse.

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Poole’s Cavern, Buxton

Poole's Cavern, Buxton

Tucked away in the spa town of Buxton lies one of Derbyshire’s most enchanting geological marvels: Poole’s Cavern.

This ancient, natural limestone cave offers a journey into the very heart of the Earth, where centuries have sculpted its interiors into fantastical formations.

Guided tours illuminate the cavern’s history, revealing tales of ancient rituals, daring explorers, and even legendary outlaws who once sought refuge within its depths.

Stalactites and stalagmites, formed over millennia, stretch and rise in ornate displays, with monikers like the “Flitch of Bacon” and “Poached Egg” adding a touch of whimsy to their majestic presence.

The cavern’s constant, cool climate provides a refreshing respite, while its ambient lighting accentuates the beauty of the crystalline structures. Above ground, the surrounding Buxton Country Park offers panoramic views and serene woodland walks.

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Solomon’s Temple, Buxton

Solomon's Temple, Buxton

Perched above the spa town of Buxton, Solomon’s Temple stands as a proud Victorian folly, offering unrivalled views of the surrounding Peak District.

This 20-foot high structure, though modest in size, promises a grand experience, with its vantage point showcasing a tapestry of rolling hills, verdant valleys, and distant landmarks.

Built in the late 19th century atop Grin Low Hill, the tower’s history is steeped in local lore, with tales suggesting ancient druid rituals once took place on this very ground.

The present-day structure, however, was designed more for pleasure than ceremony, providing locals and tourists alike a destination to admire Derbyshire’s natural splendour.

A short, invigorating walk from the Buxton Country Park car park leads to this historic gem. As you ascend the internal spiral staircase, anticipation grows, culminating in the panoramic views from the top platform.

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Sudbury Hall, Sudbury

Vintage Train

Nestled in the quaint village of Sudbury, Sudbury Hall stands as a beacon of 17th-century architectural elegance.

A quintessential example of Restoration-period design, this Grade I listed building boasts a harmonious blend of intricate plasterwork, ornate wood carvings, and masterfully crafted interiors.

The Hall’s renowned Long Gallery, with its exquisite ceiling and collection of family portraits, offers a glimpse into the grandeur of bygone eras.

Adjacent to the Hall is the National Trust Museum of Childhood which features an eclectic array of vintage toys.

The surrounding gardens and parkland complement Sudbury Hall’s magnificence, providing a tranquil setting for reflection and leisurely strolls.

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Crich Tramway Village, Crich

Crich Tramway Village, Crich
Image: tramway.co.uk

Situated in the heart of Derbyshire’s picturesque Crich, Tramway Village offers a delightful journey back in time, celebrating the golden era of tramways in the UK.

As you step onto its cobbled streets, lined with period buildings and vintage tram stops, the atmosphere transports you to bygone days.

Home to a magnificent collection of over 60 trams, the museum showcases vehicles from various eras and cities, each restored to its former glory.

Visitors can hop aboard selected trams and experience the thrill of a historic ride, complete with uniformed conductors and the iconic bell’s ring.

Interactive exhibits delve into the evolution of tramway systems, exploring their technological advancements and socio-cultural impact. The museum’s Learning Centre further enriches the experience, providing insights into the lives of the workers and the challenges of tram operations.

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The Old Original Bakewell Pudding Shop, Bakewell

The Old Original Bakewell Pudding Shop, Bakewell
Image: bakewellpuddingshop.co.uk

Tucked away in the heart of Derbyshire’s historic town of Bakewell lies a culinary institution steeped in tradition – The Old Original Bakewell Pudding Shop.

Celebrated as the birthplace of the authentic Bakewell Pudding, this establishment has been delighting palates for generations.

Unlike the more commonly known Bakewell Tart, the Bakewell Pudding boasts a unique, flaky pastry base, a layer of fragrant raspberry jam, and a rich almond egg custard topping.

The shop’s time-honoured recipe, closely guarded and passed down through the years, promises an unparalleled taste of Derbyshire’s gastronomic heritage.

Beyond its famed pudding, the shop also offers a delightful array of freshly baked goods, local delicacies, and quaint tearooms where visitors can indulge in a traditional English tea experience.

With its timber-framed façade and inviting aroma that wafts through the streets, the shop is a must-visit Derbyshire tourist attraction.

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Treak Cliff Cavern, Castleton

Cave Wall

The final entry in our guide to things to do in Derbyshire is Treak Cliff Cavern – one of Castleton’s most iconic underground visitor attractions.

Nestled within the heart of the Peak District, this limestone cave offers a remarkable journey through geological time. As you traverse its winding pathways, the cavern reveals a dazzling display of stalactites and stalagmites, each formation telling tales of millennia gone by.

But what truly sets Treak Cliff Cavern apart is its rich deposits of Blue John stone. This unique, semi-precious mineral, known for its striking blue and yellow bands, is found exclusively in this part of Derbyshire.

The cavern boasts some of the finest Blue John veins, with the Witch’s Finger and the Frozen Waterfall being standout displays.

Guided tours offer a deeper insight into the cavern’s history, geology, and the mining of Blue John stone.

Knowledgeable guides illuminate the mysteries of this subterranean world, making it accessible and fascinating for visitors of all ages – one of the more memorable Peak District attractions.

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Derbyshire Tourism Sites
https://www.visitderbyshire.co.uk
https://www.visitpeakdistrict.com


 

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